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Grady Veterinary Hospital Grady Veterinary Hospital

Phone: (513) 931‑8675
Address: Cincinnati, OH
Email: info@gradyvet.com

Pet Wellness and Preventative Care in Cincinnati OH

Pet Wellness and Preventative Care

Preventative care is crucial for the health and longevity of your pet. Our patients include dogs, cats, and exotic pets.

During your pet's first wellness check-up, the veterinarian will perform a head-to-toe exam and will compile a complete medical history. Ongoing visits will add to this record, giving an excellent overview of your pet's wellness from youth to maturity.

Wellness Care Young Pets Vaccines Senior Pet Care

We recommend making an appointment for your pet’s wellness visit during these hours:

  • Monday through Friday: 7:00 a.m.–7:00 p.m.
  • Saturday: 7:00 a.m.–3:00 p.m.

Grady Veterinary Hospital is open for walk-ins and emergencies 24/7. Since we triage for emergency care, non-emergency walk-ins may experience wait times outside our regular appointment hours.


Wellness Care For Your Pet

Staff and client with one of our patients

Pet wellness is a broad term referring to a composite of veterinary services, with our primary focus on maintaining health, quality of life, and longevity in your pet. The wellness check-up generally includes such routine care as pet vaccinations, an oral exam and parasite prevention. In addition, we may discuss important spay and neuter decisions, pet training, or a puzzling development of unwanted behaviors in your animal.

During your pet's first wellness check-up, the veterinarian will perform a head-to-toe exam and will compile a complete medical history. Ongoing visits will add to this record, giving an excellent overview of your pet's wellness from youth to maturity.

At the time of your wellness visit, please mention any unusual behavior that you have noticed, including:

  • Coughing
  • Diarrhea
  • Eating more than usual
  • Excessive drinking of water, panting, scratching, or urination
  • Vomiting
  • Weight gain or weight loss
  • Bad breath

Tell us about your pet's daily behavior, diet, water intake, and exercise routine. Depending on where you live, your pet's age, and your family lifestyle, we will likely discuss exposure to fleas, ticks, heartworms, and intestinal parasites. We then develop an individualized treatment and preventative plan that fits the needs of you and your pet.


Young Pets - Puppies, Kittens, Pocket Pets

Your New Puppy

Medical Care As soon as your puppy comes home, schedule that first check-up. Bring a stool sample to this visit, so the doctor can check for intestinal parasites. It is also a good idea to bring any available vaccination and medical records. Expect a thorough physical exam, and don't forget to bring any questions or concerns you may have. We are your medical partners in the health and well-being of your new pet.

Pet Vaccinations Mother's milk offers pups some protection from disease, but that only lasts a few weeks. As they are weaned from their mother, puppies are given vaccines to protect them from disease. The Puppy Series Vaccines gradually build immunity during the first few months, usually beginning with the first medical exam at around 6-8 weeks.

Puppy Series vaccines may include:

  • DHPP Vaccine (Distemper/Hepatitis/Parainfluenza/Parvovirus)—Given at 6 weeks, at least three doses
  • Rabies—Given at 16-18 weeks
  • Leptospirosis—Given routinely with DHPP vaccine
  • Bordetella—Given at 12 weeks
  • Influenza Vaccine—Given at 8-12 weeks, and given another booster 3 weeks later

Nutrition Good quality puppy food is important. Never give your puppy table food, as it can cause intestinal problems. Remember to keep fresh, clean water available at all times. Call our office for recommendations on feeding your new puppy, or ask us at your check-up.

Spaying/Neutering Unless you intend to breed your dog, we recommend spaying or neutering your puppy at around six months of age. An altered pet lives longer and generally has fewer medical problems and a better temperament if this is done at an early age.

Puppies need a safe, comfortable environment in which to live, as well as regular exams, vaccinations and parasite prevention, socialization, and behavioral training. At Grady Veterinary Hospital, we help you create such an environment. We enjoy meeting every new puppy and we hope to make your experience a rich and rewarding one.

The great pleasure of a dog is that you may make a fool of yourself with him and not only will he not scold you, but he will make a fool of himself too.” Samuel Butler

Your New Kitten

Medical Care As soon as your kitten comes home, schedule that first check-up. Bring a stool sample to this visit, so the doctor can check for intestinal parasites. It is also a good idea to bring any available vaccination and medical records. Expect a thorough physical exam, and don't forget to bring any questions or concerns you may have. We are your medical partners in the health and well-being of your new pet.

Vaccinations Mother's milk offers kittens some protection from disease, but that only lasts a few weeks. As they are weaned from their mother, kittens are given vaccines to protect them from disease. The Kitten Series vaccines gradually build immunity during the first few months, usually beginning with the first medical exam at around 6 weeks.

Kitten Series vaccines may include:

  • FVRCP (Feline Distemper)—Given at 6 weeks, at least three doses
  • Rabies—Given at 14-16 weeks
  • FeLv (Feline Leukemia)—Given at 8 and 12 weeks

Nutrition Good quality kitten food is important. Never give your kitten table food, as it can cause intestinal problems. Remember to keep fresh, clean water available at all times. Call our office for recommendations on feeding your new kitten.

Spaying/Neutering We recommend spaying or neutering your kitten at around six months of age. An altered pet lives longer and generally has fewer medical problems and a better temperament if this is done at an early age.

Your New Ferret

Popular for their size and friendly disposition, ferrets can be great pets, but they require appropriate care. They live a relatively long time for small pets—6 to 10 years—and require a rather large commitment.

Placement Ferrets may bite, so they may not be a good choice for families with young children. They generally get along with dogs and cats if introduced carefully, but should not be placed in homes with birds, rodents, or small reptiles.

Vaccinations General recommendations are as follows:

  • Ferret Distemper at 8 and 12 weeks, then annually
  • Rabies at 14 weeks, then every 3 years

Spay/Neuter A male ferret is known as a hob, and a female is known as a jill. Get a spayed/neutered ferret, if possible, as breeding is not recommended. Most ferrets from farms or pet stores will already be altered. If not, have the ferret altered at the age of six months. The AAHA® reports that neutering is necessary for jills to avoid deadly aplastic anemia. Altering a ferret may actually improve its disposition, diminishing aggression and territoriality.

Nutrition Ferrets are carnivores and require a high meat protein diet. Specialty ferret foods are recommended and fruits and vegetables make a nice treat. Fresh water must be available, and is best served in a bottle since ferrets may play with water in a bowl.

If a ferret bites you it is nearly always your own fault.” Phil Drabble

Your New Pocket Pet

Rabbits, hamsters, gerbils, rats, mice, and guinea pigs are often called pocket pets because they are small and inexpensive. These small animals have specific diets, housing, and handling requirements, and each one requires special care and attention. Before you purchase one of these pets, be certain that it meets your needs and expectations. If you aren't sure, contact our office for recommendations.

An excellent rabbit resource is the House Rabbit Society®.


A client with one of our patients in the waiting room

Pet Vaccinations

Vaccines Protect Your Pets

The need for vaccines can be a confusing subject, so the following is a general overview. We will examine your pet at the first check-up, and create a vaccination schedule to fit your pet's needs and lifestyle.

Pet vaccination needs depend upon a wide range of variables, such as age and lifestyle. For example, a house cat's medical profile will vary greatly from that of a barn cat, just as the needs of a young hunting dog differ from those of an aging family pet. Your pet's health plan is designed to be flexible, changing over time and circumstance. Vaccines may be added or eliminated, depending on such changes and for optimum long-term health.

We work with you to determine the appropriate vaccines for every animal, at every stage, and for every lifestyle.

Common Canine Vaccines
  • DAPP vaccine—DAPP stands for Distemper, Adenovirus, Parainfluenza, and Parvovirus. DHPP vaccine, otherwise known as the puppy vaccine, DHPP stands for Distemper, Hepatitis, Parainfluenza, and Parvovirus.
  • Distemper virus—Attacks the lungs and affects the function of the brain and spinal cord; disease can be fatal
  • Hepatitis—Affects the liver and can cause loss of vision
  • Parainfluenza—Respiratory virus that causes coughing
  • Parvovirus—Attacks the lining of the intestinal tract and damages the heart of very young puppies; disease can be fatal
  • Adult dogs usually also have a Leptospirosis vaccine included.
  • Rabies vaccine—This is a fatal viral disease that can infect all warm-blooded animals, including dogs and humans.
  • Leptospirosis vaccine—This is a bacterial infection that can damage your dog's liver, kidneys, and other major organs. Other dogs, and even humans, can become ill after contact with an infected dog's urine.
  • Bordetella Bronchiseptica vaccine—This is a bacterial infection contributing to the respiratory disease commonly known as kennel cough. This disease can be much more severe when accompanied by a viral infection. This vaccine is often required for use of boarding kennels, dog parks, obedience school, veterinary hospitals, or grooming facilities.
  • Influenza Vaccine—This is a contagious respiratory disease in dogs caused by Influenza viruses known to infect dogs. This vaccine is often required for use of boarding kennels, dog parks, obedience schools, veterinary hospitals, or grooming facilities.
Common Feline Vaccines
  • FVRCP vaccine—Feline Distemper may be particularly severe in kittens and is potentially fatal
  • Rabies vaccine—This is a fatal viral disease that can infect all warm-blooded animals, including cats and humans.
  • Feline Leukemia—Feline Leukemia is a cause of serious illness and death in cats.

Senior Pet Care

Health Changes in Senior Pets

Due to advances in technology and veterinary medicine, pets are able to live longer than ever before. With this increase in lifespan, however, comes the probability of your pet developing diseases or conditions specific to seniors.

Age-related changes may include:
  • Osteoarthritis
  • Kidney, heart, or liver disease
  • Tumors and cancers
  • Diabetes
  • Thyroid imbalance
  • Weight increase or decrease
  • Mobility challenges
  • Behavioral concerns, such as irritability or aggression
  • Dental disease

To guide veterinary hospitals like ours in developing optimal healthcare plans for senior pets, AAHA® issued a set of Senior Care Guidelines for Dogs and Cats. These guidelines challenge veterinarians to raise the bar when caring for senior pets.

Senior Health Exams

Scheduling regular pet wellness visits is one of the most important steps for an owner of a mature pet. Senior care is needed to catch and delay the onset or progress of disease, and for the early detection of problems such as organ failure and osteoarthritis.

AAHA® recommends that healthy senior dogs and cats visit the veterinarian every six months for a complete exam and laboratory testing. Keep in mind that every year for a dog or cat is equivalent to five-seven human years. To stay current with your senior pet's health care, we strongly advise twice-a-year exams.

Laboratory testing for senior pets will typically include the following:

  • Urinalysis
  • Complete blood count
  • Blood-chemistry panel
  • Parasite testing

Your pet might require other tests, especially if your dog or cat is displaying signs of illness or discomfort. Our diagnostic skills and equipment, combined with your careful observations and reporting, result in successful diagnosis and treatment for many age-related concerns.